Advice:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this website may contain images and voices of people who have died.

Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Introduction, Kirstin McKenzie

Hi everyone and welcome to our blog - Week 10 Aboriginal Voices. I will be reviewing two films, Samson and Delila and Stone Bros.

14 comments:

  1. Hi Kirsti,
    nice blog!
    Looking forward to speaking soon
    ang

    ReplyDelete
  2. i) Textual Analysis: In reference to a poem or paragraph from a book that you have found particularly well written, interesting or moving discuss how its author uses voice, imagery, symbolism, metaphor, sound, irony or other literary tools to communicate its message?
    ii) Reading Positions: With reference to a chosen Indigenous text (book, poem, artwork, song or film), analyse your own response to the work. In what ways has it shifted your thinking about Australian society, Indigenous peoples or histories?
    iii) Preparing for the major essay: Choose one of the essay questions and write some notes on how you may research the question in light of the text that you are discussing. Apart from the creative and critical texts that you will discuss, find 3 other references and share them with other students in the workshop. (Please note: You don’t need to write your essay plan, just thoughts ‘in progress’ on how you may tackle the question.)
    iv) Engaging with the themes of the course: Please choose one theme eg. questions of identity and authenticity. In the light of knowledge gained from your reading, evaluate the arguments presented in the course materials.
    just thought i would put this up so we can check as we go.....

    ReplyDelete
  3. so will we be working on the same materials or drawing from different sources each?

    ReplyDelete
  4. i still have to get clear on how we will tie all our work in together...
    i am thinkin of looking at some poetry of sam wagan watson, even kev carmody's- from little things big things grow, which makes reference to vincent lingiari, as I have his speech to parliament in relation to wave hill stations, in which he and his family were put to work for almost nothing. Also am fascintated by Richard Green, aboriginal actor in the film, Boxing day...there is some amazing spoken word poetry in the special features of the DVD..
    Also, one night the moon is pretty good.....
    hmmmmmmm
    will get cracking on this after we hand in the book review on the 2nd???

    ReplyDelete
  5. There is so much fabulous material available !! I think all of your suggestions are good, I particularly like Kev Carmody's work. Choose what you like and present it as either one or several posts (that's what I'm going to do). Later on we can upload some more interesting stuff like pics, video links, etc to tie it all together and make the blog look more interesting! This is fun =)

    ReplyDelete
  6. that sounds awesome!
    will post again on the weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey Ang, you can also find me on Facebook .. Kirsti McKenzie :D

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Ang, the Course Guide states this is a 1500 word presentation - are you happy with 750-800 words each to write our blurbs? K

    ReplyDelete
  9. sounds like a plan!

    I want to share with you a poem that had a profound impact on me.
    I especially appreciated the creative use of prose and the dark irony cooked deep into the heart of the recipe.
    Before I do share it;

    I would like to honour the traditional custodians of Brisbane, the Yuggera and Turball people.

    I am saddened by the fact that their Country is not what it once was.

    Written by Samuel Wagan Watson (b.1972)



    Recipe for Metropolis Brisbane.




    Serves: Nearly 3 million people
    (give or take a generation)

    Ingredients:
    1 utopian landscape with a blue river

    1 mixture of European cultures seasoned with convicts

    200 years of conservative politics
    1 trillion tons of bitumen, steel, gas, concrete and treated timber

    garnish with exhaust


    1. Peel the utopian landscape of most of its flora, fauna and Indigenous flavour.
    Place what remains in an obscure melting pot on medium heat.

    2. Stir in a mixture of European cultures seasoned with convicts. Other cultural flavours may emerge in the process. They can be included or excluded. Cover and allow to simmer for over two centuries.

    3. Every 10 years, add some conservative politics and gradually pour in the 1 trillion tons of bitumen, steel, glass, concrete and treated timber. Stir until the blue river turns brown.

    4. Firstly, your dish will gel into Brisbane Town; drain and stir until it becomes Brisbane City; cover, and allow to simmer.
    Include the rest of the politics until the desired thickness of Metropolis Brisbane is achieved.

    Cook's note: Metropolis Brisbane is best served with the aroma of lead exhaust, sprinkled over the dish!



    Well if that didn't make the reader ponder (or even lose their apetite) then I will be truly surprised.

    I have lived in West End, Brisbane which led me to me discovering just how bad it truly was for Aboriginal people. The main street of West End's Boundary street was in fact just that: a boundary. A division ( yet another) that prevented Aboriginal people from crossing after 6pm. That truly evoked anger within me and it and often felt a yearning to hear more Aboriginal stories of Place and of the creation of the Brisbane River.

    Have you ever seen a map of the river and noticed how far it 'snakes' along the Country?

    I will also try include a map I just found which made me sneer, as it is a colonized version which maps out parts of the land to pillage.. for example: 'good timber', 'good open grazing country'

    It gives more validity to the poem don't you think?

    ReplyDelete
  10. http://www.ourindooroopilly.com/graphics/riverd7.jpg

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Ang, thanks for calling today - nice to talk to you! You should be able to embed video into your post, don't forget to make sure you are signed in first though. The poem is interesting, I also lived in Brisbane for 10 years (St Lucia, right on the river near the golf course and uni). I often wondered about Aboriginal families I had seen sitting under trees in Musgrave Park? Don't forget to reference a framework (eg, segregation from mainstream society, or whatever you choose)when you analyse the text. Also,a reference or two from our main text (Heiss) would be great. Oh, and another tip, because this is an academic piece, try not to use overly-emotive language in your work - can be difficult, I know!Good luck! x

    ReplyDelete
  12. Ang, perhaps you could add a new post now which introduces yourself and the work you plan to present! Go girl ...

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Ang, I see you got a video bar up, well done! Unfortunately it and the other two I posted all feature four unrelated and very annoying videos which I don't know how to remove without also losing the good ones - I've lost count of how many times I have tried !! You are brilliant if you can resolve it =)

    ReplyDelete
  14. really, that is what I was just struggling with also. I keep getting worried I may accidentally remove some posts. I hope we can edit all this in the end as I just took your advice and put up a brief post and looks a bit crazy.!
    will try to past poem back as a main post.

    ReplyDelete